Samsung Electronics Discovers Groundbreaking Method to Commercialize New Material for Electronics

April 4, 2014 | Comments | Tomorrow Works

Summary:

• Samsung Electronics announced a breakthrough synthesis method to speed the commercialization of graphene, a unique material ideally suited for electronic devices.

 

• Graphene has one hundred times greater electron mobility than silicon.

 

• Graphene is more durable than steel and has high heat conductibility as well as flexibility, which makes it the perfect material for use in flexible displays, wearables and other next generation electronic devices.

 

 

Samsung Electronics Discovers Groundbreaking Method to Commercialize New Material for Electronics

Graphene has potential to usher in new era of next generation electronic devices, including flexible displays and wearable technology

 

Samsung Electronics announced a breakthrough synthesis method to speed the commercialization of graphene, a unique material ideally suited for electronic devices. Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT), in partnership with Sungkyunkwan University, became the first in the world to develop this new method.   

 

“This is one of the most significant breakthroughs in graphene research in history,” said the laboratory leaders at SAIT’s Lab. “We expect this discovery to accelerate the commercialization of graphene, which could unlock the next era of consumer electronic technology.”

 

Graphene has one hundred times greater electron mobility than silicon, the most widely used material in semiconductors today. It is more durable than steel and has high heat conductibility as well as flexibility, which makes it the perfect material for use in flexible displays, wearables and other next generation electronic devices.

 

Through its partnership with Sungkyungkwan University’s School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, SAIT uncovered a new method of growing large area, single crystal wafer scale graphene. Engineers around the world have invested heavily in research for the commercialization of graphene, but have faced many obstacles due to the challenges associated with it. In the past, researchers have found that multi-crystal synthesis – the process of synthesizing small graphene particles to produce large-area graphene – deteriorated the electric and mechanical properties of the material, limiting its application range and making it difficult to commercialize.

 

The new method developed by SAIT and Sungkyunkwan University synthesizes large-area graphene into a single crystal on a semiconductor, maintaining its electric and mechanical properties. The new method repeatedly synthesizes single crystal graphene on the current semiconductor wafer scale.

 

Over the past several decades, the growth of the semiconductor industry has been driven by the ability to grow the area of a silicon wafer, while steadily decreasing the process node. In order to commercialize graphene to displace the industry’s reliance on silicon, it is vital to develop a new method to grow a single crystal graphene into a large area.

 

The research results will be published in the April 4 issue of Science Magazine and ScienceExpress, one of the world’s most prestigious science journals.

 

Samsung and Sungkyunkwan University have been partnering in the field of nano research since 2006. This breakthrough is a testament to the strengths of the two institutions, who together were able to successfully achieve results that could become a driver of next generation technology.

 

The research was funded by Korea’s Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (MSIP), under the Project to Nurture Leading Creative Researching Experts Program.

 

 

About Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology

Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT), founded as Samsung Group's R&D Hub since October 1987. SAIT, established as the incubator for cutting-edge technologies under the founding philosophy of boundless search for breakthroughs and guided by the vision of changing the World through creative research. SAIT also functions as the Chief Technology Officer (CTO) for the Samsung group including Samsung Electronics, establishing the group's overall R&D outlook and strategy. Visit http://www.sait.samsung.co.kr/

 

 

About Sungkyungkwan University School of Advanced Materials and Science

School of Advanced Materials Science & Engineering and SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology have focused on the design and fabrication of low-dimensional functional nanomaterials.

 

About Science Express

Science Express provides electronic publication of selected Science papers in advance of print. Some editorial changes may occur between the online version and the final printed version. Visit https://www.sciencemag.org/content/early/recent

  • Achim

    wow… great job!

    • samsungtomorrow

      Thanks, @Achim!

  • hot_spare

    Like this :)

    • samsungtomorrow

      We’re glad you like it, @hot_spare:disqus!

  • gt-01

    This will be used for the new Galaxy Prime series?

  • curly.nige

    Well done

    • samsungtomorrow

      Thanks, @curlynige:disqus !

  • Moe Espressa

    Graphene City

  • Blue Gum

    Pics or it didn’t happen.

  • Ingramator

    How long until we can see this implemented in the consumer sphere?

  • George

    Does this represent advancement for graphene battery technology?

  • http://dylanmtaylor.com/ Dylan Taylor

    Is this mostly theoretical, or will we see this implemented in any actual products soon?

  • curly.nige

    I think Samsung could make all it’s wearable tech years ago, But they couldn’t mass-produce it .This has all changed now . Can’t wait to see what tech you have Samsung, I will have to get saving :-)

  • https://www.mrminigun.com Ian Bivens

    Products based on this technology will foster a whole new wave of manufacturing. Hopefully, America will be part of it.

  • Jerry Joe Seltzer

    I’m surprised about how little talk there is about the ‘Greenness’ of this technology. Graphene is composed solely of carbon atoms, which are as common as oxygen. Products made from Graphene which are eventually discarded will be completely non-toxic to the environment and 100% recyclable. Much focus has been put on the new technology made possible by Graphene but little is being said about the old technology. This will replace plastic water bottles, rubber tires, and styrofoam cups. It will even replace copper wires, for dramatically more efficient power grids. We will be changing our mindset to one of a carbon footprint to that of a carbon parachute, saving us from our once inevitable fall.

    • Hansel

      The applications are to great to discuss in 9 paragraphs. It truly is a wonder substance/discovery.

    • http://www.technogala.com/ TechnoGala

      From your words, Graphene seems to be Eco-friendly and this is good news for all of us!

    • rooot

      If Samsung can do it, graphene (C) would be replacing silicon (Si) which is as green as carbon. you can dump as much silicon as you want in nature. it’s sand!

    • nichogenius

      Sure it’s environmentally ‘green’ but it could be pretty toxic too. Imagine a paper cut… now imagine a paper cut involving the edge of a single sheet of graphene. I doubt that it would pose much of a threat on a macro scale, but I believe I’ve read an article or two on its ability to slice through cell walls. I’m excited for some of the crazy things it can do, but I’m more than a little concerned that states will start listing it as a toxic material.

      • Jerry Joe Seltzer

        I see your point. There is the possibility that debris from all these things could degrade and form a hazard similar to fiberglass fibers or asbestos. Luckily, each ‘sheet’ of graphene is one atom thick. There is no bond between the layers, since all six of the available covalent bonds are already taken. That means our bodies would only need to deal with one atomic sheet at a time which it can easily do. My guess is any potential harm will be greatly offset by the environmental benefits. However, you are right that we should keep an eye out for unintended consequences. History has certainly taught us that much about new materials.

  • aaa

    Great work. Did you use natural graphite or synthetic graphite for this process?

  • http://www.technogala.com/ TechnoGala

    Great break through!

    • samsungtomorrow

      Thanks, @technogala:disqus! We appreciate it! =)

  • Daddy do dodo

    @samsungtomorrow:disqus : when can we expect to see the first mass market products using graphene? (which year?) More specifically when will we have long duration batteries based on this technology? Because I don’t really care about flexing my screen if I can’t use it for more than half a day… Flexing screens won’t really change my life even if it’s probably more convenient in daily uses. Long duration batteries will because it expands the range of mobility and they will create a new economy based on electricity instead of oil.

    • samsungtomorrow

      @ Daddy do dodo , that is some deep question that we cannot currently answer at the moment. We love your enthusiasm and concern for the technology and economy of the future, but we just don’t have enough information on it… yet.

  • http://www.abicana.com/shop2.htm Knut Holt

    Graphene could be the base for a new type of batteries constructed as capacitators. Great amounts of electric enetrgy can possibly be stored in capacitators made of graphene sheets with a thin insulator sheet between. The graphene sheet could possibly be grown continually upon two insulator bands and the whole thing simultanously rolled togeather.